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Kay Meek Centre

Located in West Vancouver, Kay Meek Centre for the Performing Arts features two theatres: the 500-seat Main Theatre, and the more intimate 200-seat Studio Theatre.

The Main Theatre is a traditional proscenium arch theatre with continental seating that offers comfort and excellent sightlines. Beautifully finished with blond wood, soft pink brick and rich purple fabrics, the theatre also boasts acoustics that are well suited to the wide range of performances taking place in the venue.

The Studio Theatre, sometimes referred to as a black box theatre, offers adjustable seating for maximum flexibility of the space.

The theatres are designed to operate simultaneously and independently with their own lobby spaces and dedicated dressing rooms, as well as with generous staging and loading areas, green room and laundry.

The facility is very much the product of one person’s vision, energy and financial generosity. Mrs. Kay Meek was a long time resident of West Vancouver and supporter of Lower Mainland arts organizations.

As a rental and presenting venue, Kay Meek Centre offers an extensive range of activities that attracts patrons from West Vancouver, and across the North Shore and Lower Mainland. The diversity of events caters to a broad range of tastes and ages, and continues to develop large and varied audience.

As a presenter of cultural events, Kay Meek Centre is committed to presenting artistic excellence in a range of experiences that would not otherwise be available in West Vancouver. These events focus on theatre, music, dance and film.

Kay Meek Centre is a proud community partner of the West Vancouver School District and the Municipality of West Vancouver.

Scandinavian Community Centre

Representing the Scandinavian communities of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, the Scandinavian Community Centre supports various activities and events related to these communities within the Greater Vancouver area. Some examples of annual events include the European Festival and the Scandinavian Midsummer Festival.

Italian Cultural Centre

In 1974 the Consul of Italy, Giovanni Germano, met with the Premier of British Columbia, Dave Barret. In the Provincial Legislature the Premier represented the riding of Vancouver-Hastings, an area heavily inhabited by Canadians of Italian origin. The Premier was well aware of the wish of the Italian community and he therefore challenged Consul Germano to find the support and turn the dream into a reality. Premier Barret assured Consul Germano that a grant from the B.C. Government would be available. At Vancouver City Hall, Mayor Art Phillips, also well aware of the wish of the Italian community, indicated to Consul Germano the possibility of obtaining city land at a special price. The land had already been chosen: an 8-acre city dump in the heart of Vancouver East.

Sunset Community Centre

The new Sunset Community Centre opened its doors to the public on Monday, December 17, 2007. The 30,000 sq ft stylish structure was designed by Bing Thom Architects and was built by Haebler Construction Ltd. at a cost of just over $12 million. Funding for the project came from the Government of Canada, the Province of British Columbia, the City of Vancouver, the Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation and the Sunset Community Association.

The striking new facility, 20% larger than the old centre, boasts a uniquely curved roofline resembling a five-petaled flower when viewed from the air. Major programmable space includes a full-sized gymnasium featuring a hardwood floor and ceiling, two multipurpose rooms, a fitness centre, aerobics/dance room, arts and crafts room, youth room and two preschools. As well a new passive park space to the south of the building has been created.

Douglas Park Community Centre

This recreation facility has a long history, one entwined with that of beautiful Douglas Park. The building site was once the location for a popular park pavilion which stood from 1928 until the Douglas Park Community Hall was constructed in 1966 and has evolved over the decades into one of Vancouver’s most popular neighbourhood recreational facilities. Located near the centre of Douglas Park’s tree-lined 13 acres, the community centre offers a wide range of programs for all ages but with a strong focus on preschool and school age activities. New programming for youth has resulted in a featured skateboard activity along with expanded offerings for seniors and people with disabilities. A half gymnasium, popular exercise room and numerous activity rooms round out this facility’s jam-packed recreational agenda.

Kerrisdale Community Centre

Kerrisdale Community Centre is operated jointly by the Kerrisdale Community Centre Society and the Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation.

Welcome to the Kerrisdale Community Centre. Our past renovations have provided many new and beautiful spaces in which to hold your next meeting or celebration.

Lind Hall at False Creek Community Centre

Opened in 1980, the construction of False Creek Community Centre was one of several public facilities planned by the City of Vancouver who developed this former industrial area located on the the southern shore of False Creek. Its prime location on bustling Granville Island coupled with its access to the waterfront provide additional and unique programming opportunities. Presently in the midst of receiving an expansion and other improvements, the centre primarily serves a population of “baby boomers” (those born between 1947 and 1965) but offers a roster of programs and events for all ages. Specialty programs and services include canoeing, kayaking, tennis, performing arts, after school daycare and a well-equipped fitness centre. False Creek’s proximity to Vancouver’s seaside bicycle route makes an excellent starting point for cycling excursions; either west to Spanish Bank or east toward Stanley Park and Coal Harbour.

Poirier Community Centre

A place to hang out with your friends after school and on the weekend, located at the Poirier Community Centre. Challenge the Youth Staff to a game of pool or ping pong, use the computer for school work or games, take in a movie or just chill and listen to some music. There are different events every weekend and it is fully supervised – and free! Bring your friends and make new ones. This is the place for you. We are located in the Poirier Community Centre (630 Poirier St.)

Fleetwood Community Centre

The Fleetwood Community Association was formed in 1923 to deal with community business and provide recreation for its members. Fleetwood Community Hall was built in the 1930’s to meet this mandate and quickly became the focal point of activity for the community as well as a place where the Association conducted its business. In 1995, we moved to our current office in the Fleetwood Community Center at 84th Avenue & 160th Street.

Roundhouse Community Centre

Prefered Caterer Statud

Savoury Chef is recognized as a prefered or exclusive caterer to this venue.

Please contact us to celebrate your next memorable event at the Roundhouse Community Centre.


As a public facility, jointly operated by the Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation and the Roundhouse Community Arts and Recreation Society, the Roundhouse Community Centre is Vancouver’s oldest heritage building located on its original site.

After Expo 86 closed, all of the temporary buildings used during the fair were dismantled and removed leaving the Roundhouse sitting alone on Pacific Boulevard at the foot of Davie Street. Except as a backdrop for the occasional film being shot on location, the Roundhouse sat empty waiting for the next phase of its use as a key building in Vancouver’s history. When Concord Pacific proposed the overall development plan for the new community on the 204 acres of False Creek north waterfront, the historic Roundhouse was designated as a public amenity and plans for a new community centre began — but only after attempts to turn the Roundhouse into a collection of boutique shops were defeated by concerted citizens’ action. Zoning that would ensure its rejuvenation into a public facility was enacted in 1993.